David B. Milne

Distant View of Boston Corners 1921,

Watercolour
15.38 x 22.25 in

Alander cabin, Lower Berkshires, Massachusetts,
16 February 1921.
Milne inventory #202.15

Signed upper left, David B. Milne Feb 16 1921

Provenance:
Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, Toronto, 1956
Private collection, Ottawa
Private collection, Toronto

Exhibitions:
Possibly, Art Association of Montreal, 1924, #60,
as Village in the Valley, Grey.
Possibly, Arts Club, Montreal, 1924.
Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, Montreal, David Milne,
Retrospective Exhibition, September 2001, #20.

In writing to Patsy Milne, 12 Feb. 1921, David asks; “I wonder if you could get me about 2 sheets of water color paper
and either a tube of permanent violet or a tube of cerulean blue. No need of sending more than two sheets because that will let me
do watercolor the week before [the trip to New York City].” Distant View of Boston Corners was probably painted on the paper
Patsy Milne sent. It and Under Mountain House both may have been taken to New York on 18 Feb. to be shown to dealers.

Milne’s decision to find seclusion for the winter of 1920/21 in a high, sheltered valley on the flank of Alander Mountain in the Lower Berkshires,
where he expected to address new subject matter in his paintings may have been sparked by rereading Thoreau. After moving into his little half-barrel shaped retreat at Alander at Christmas, Milne spent the next four months painting and writing steadily. Despite the energy Milne spent writing and painting, the time he had to give to chores and fetching supplies from Boston Corners seems to have been excessive. When
Milne left Alander on 9 May 1921 he had completed only thirty paintings. Roughly 15 oils and 15 watercolours. By early spring, the Milne bank account, despite Patsy’s contributions, was in need of replenishing, so Milne left Alander to do repair work at a tiny country house owned by an acquaintance of his at Mount Riga, just a short distance from Boston Corners. He was thirty-nine years old.
David B. Milne, Catalogue Raisonne of the Paintings, David Milne Jr and David Silcox